Regions

Regions

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Costa Rica is a small country, at just 19,653 square miles (51,100 square kilometers), but its varying elevations give birth to rolling valleys, tropical beaches and sky-high mountain peaks. This diversity of terrain and landscapes creates a variety of habitats, which we classify into 10 regions. Some, like Monteverde and Arenal, are small regions with big personality, while others stretch for miles and encompass several popular destinations, national parks, and biological corridors.

  • Caribbean Coast

    Caribbean Coast

    Perhaps the most underdeveloped, and underestimated, regions of Costa Rica is it’s northeastern Caribbean Coast.

  • Guanacaste & The North Pacific

    Guanacaste & The North Pacific

    The Province of Guanacaste in North-Western Costa Rica, along with being the home to countless gorgeous beaches, holds one of the largest tracks of Tropical Dry Forest in Meso-America.

  • Nicoya Peninsula

    Nicoya Peninsula

    The Nicoya Peninsula is home to some of Costa Rica’s most beautiful beaches, including Playa Samara, Montezuma and Santa Teresa. The region’s location provides it with year-long enviable weather, as well as a rich bio-diversity that...

  • The Central Pacific

    The Central Pacific

    From the Port of Puntarenas, to just south of Manuel Antonio, the Central Pacific area of Costa Rica is full of incredible places to explore and enjoy.

  • Osa Peninsula & The South Pacific

    Osa Peninsula & The South Pacific

    It’s said that more than half of all of Costa Rica’s animal species live in the Osa Peninsula. This biologically rich area is accessible only by plane or boat, which ensures that most of its land remains unspoiled by civilization.

  • San Jose & Central Valley

    San Jose & Central Valley

    The Central Valley is the most culturally exciting area in Costa Rica, with countless museums, art galleries, theaters as well as colonial structures spread evenly across the cities it covers (Alajuela, Heredia, San José and Cartago).

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